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      Battle Of
       West Point
 The Battle of West Point

Assembling at Fort Tyler

        The fort was commanded by Brig. Gen. Robert C. Tyler.  When notified of the imminent approach of the Federals, Tyler assembled a small group of approximately 120 Confederates inside the fort composed of soldiers on leave, hospital aides, and local boys.  (Note there are varying accounts of the number of Confederate soldiers that fought within the fort and in the town of West Point.  These range from 120 to 265)  They manned the earthen fort and named it in honor of their General.  The fort, built 18 months earlier, contained three artillery pieces: a 32-pounder which was placed on the southeast corner of the fort, and two 12-pound Parrot guns, one of which was placed on the southwest corner and another on the northwest corner.  Numerous stories and folklore abound concerning that Easter Sunday.  Most notable are stories of young boys wanting to help in the battle.  One such story is about "Major" Anderson.

        Once in West Point, the fight started early, 10-11 a.m., and it went on 'til dusk. The Union cavalrymen commanded by Col. Oscar LaGrange easily circumvented the fort and took a river bridge, but they couldn't feel secure with Tyler's 32-pound cannon aimed at their backs.  

Click here to view a description of the fort with photos

Personal memoirs by a Union soldier tell of the moment:

Next Page    A Fierce Battle

 

Sources:

  Randall Allen, "A Most Voluntary Gathering,"  The Battle of West Point, Chattahoochee Valley Historical Society, 1997, pp. 23

  Donald J. Downs, "Last Fort or Redoubt Battle of the War Between the States?  It Could Easily Have Been," pp. 1

  Randall Allen, "A Most Voluntary Gathering,"  The Battle of West Point, Chattahoochee Valley Historical Society, 1997, pp. 24