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      Battle Of
       West Point
 The War Concludes

        The war effort being lost, Confederates forces were resolved to defend their towns and way of life.  The effort was futile.  Federal forces made a clean sweep of southern towns defeating or accepting the surrender of any resistance.  

        Jefferson Davis, and several of his prominent associates, were captured near Irwinsville, Georgia, May 10th , by Colonel Pritchard of the Fourth Michigan cavalry. Colonel Harnden, of the First Wisconsin cavalry, was also near with his regiment, having followed Mr. Davis' line of flight for three days. These regiments belonged to Wilson's corps and were operating under his direct instructions, transmitted through their respective division commanders.

        After the surrender of all the Confederate forces east of the Mississippi River, the cavalry of the Military Division of the Mississippi was disposed throughout the South to maintain order as against guerrillas, and all citizens who were unwilling to accept the situation.

        At the close of the war there were six major-generals in the Regular Army, and General Thomas was the junior. Learning from a friend in Washington, that the country was to be divided into five military divisions, to be commanded respectively by the five ranking major-generals, while he was to command a department, he was intensely indignant, and at once adopted measures to avert the humiliation if possible. At the time, Brigadier-General John F. Miller was commanding the post of Nashville, and as he was intimately acquainted with President Johnson, he was requested by General Thomas to bear a message to the President. General Thomas had a map giving the proposed boundaries of the military divisions and departments, and the names of the generals to be severally assigned to their command; placing this map in the hands of General Miller Thomas said:

"I wish you to take the first train for Washington, and tell President Johnson that during the war I permitted the National authorities to do what they pleased with me; they put my juniors over me, and I served under them; the life of the Nation was then at stake, and it was not then proper to press questions of rank, but now that the war is over and the Nation saved, I demand a command suited to my rank, or I do not want any."

        He also commissioned General Miller to present to the President a list of officers recommended by himself for brevet appointments, stating that in this respect the Army of the Cumberland had not been treated as liberally as other armies.

       Upon arrival in Washington, General Miller called upon the President, who then had rooms in the Treasury building, and told him that he bore a message from General Thomas and requested an audience at the earliest practicable moment. The President replied that he would hear him at once, and invited Miller to his private room. When they were alone General Miller delivered his message, presented the map and said; "General Thomas has not expressed a preference for any part of the country, but as he served during the war in the States between the Mississippi and the Alleghenies, I would suggest that his command should embrace some of these States." The President said in reply: "You know my appreciation of General Thomas" and after considering the matter, State by State, he drew a line with his pencil along the outer boundaries of Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia, said: "That is the military division for General Thomas," and placing the point of his pencil on Nashville, added: "There are his headquarters."

        The war effort being lost, Confederates forces were resolved to defend their towns and way of life.  The effort was futile.  Federal forces made a clean sweep of southern towns defeating or accepting the surrender of any resistance.  

        Jefferson Davis, and several of his prominent associates, were captured near Irwinsville, Georgia, May 10th , by Colonel Pritchard of the Fourth Michigan cavalry. Colonel Harnden, of the First Wisconsin cavalry, was also near with his regiment, having followed Mr. Davis' line of flight for three days. These regiments belonged to Wilson's corps and were operating under his direct instructions, transmitted through their respective division commanders.

        After the surrender of all the Confederate forces east of the Mississippi River, the cavalry of the Military Division of the Mississippi was disposed throughout the South to maintain order as against guerrillas, and all citizens who were unwilling to accept the situation.

        At the close of the war there were six major-generals in the Regular Army, and General Thomas was the junior. Learning from a friend in Washington, that the country was to be divided into five military divisions, to be commanded respectively by the five ranking major-generals, while he was to command a department, he was intensely indignant, and at once adopted measures to avert the humiliation if possible. At the time, Brigadier-General John F. Miller was commanding the post of Nashville, and as he was intimately acquainted with President Johnson, he was requested by General Thomas to bear a message to the President. General Thomas had a map giving the proposed boundaries of the military divisions and departments, and the names of the generals to be severally assigned to their command; placing this map in the hands of General Miller Thomas said:

"I wish you to take the first train for Washington, and tell President Johnson that during the war I permitted the National authorities to do what they pleased with me; they put my juniors over me, and I served under them; the life of the Nation was then at stake, and it was not then proper to press questions of rank, but now that the war is over and the Nation saved, I demand a command suited to my rank, or I do not want any."

        He also commissioned General Miller to present to the President a list of officers recommended by himself for brevet appointments, stating that in this respect the Army of the Cumberland had not been treated as liberally as other armies.

       Upon arrival in Washington, General Miller called upon the President, who then had rooms in the Treasury building, and told him that he bore a message from General Thomas and requested an audience at the earliest practicable moment. The President replied that he would hear him at once, and invited Miller to his private room. When they were alone General Miller delivered his message, presented the map and said; "General Thomas has not expressed a preference for any part of the country, but as he served during the war in the States between the Mississippi and the Alleghenies, I would suggest that his command should embrace some of these States." The President said in reply: "You know my appreciation of General Thomas" and after considering the matter, State by State, he drew a line with his pencil along the outer boundaries of Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia, said: "That is the military division for General Thomas," and placing the point of his pencil on Nashville, added: "There are his headquarters."